large-landscape.jpg

Large Landscape Conservation

Zambia and the region are characterized by dryland ecosystems that are highly seasonal in the extent and amount of water available, and require mobility for both wildlife and people to respond to these changes in rainfall and flooding patterns, particularly in the face of climate change.  Consequently large landscape connectivity is of critical importance and can be compromised by an array of human activities, including encroachment, poorly planned roads, dams and fencing, and lack of land-use planning.  We work closely with an array of local, national and international partners to help address these issues.

 Satellite-GPS locations from the Luangwa Valley’s newly-formed Chakolwa Pack document their visiting four national parks and four GMAs before finally settling in North Luangwa. Such large-scale movements demonstrate the importance of connectivity and preservation of the Luangwa river corridor.

Satellite-GPS locations from the Luangwa Valley’s newly-formed Chakolwa Pack document their visiting four national parks and four GMAs before finally settling in North Luangwa. Such large-scale movements demonstrate the importance of connectivity and preservation of the Luangwa river corridor.

 The Luangwa river in the dry season. Zambia is characterized by dryland ecosystems with severe variability in rainfall and water availability, making connectivity and protection of land and watersheds critical—particularly in the face of climate change 

The Luangwa river in the dry season. Zambia is characterized by dryland ecosystems with severe variability in rainfall and water availability, making connectivity and protection of land and watersheds critical—particularly in the face of climate change